Intention-o-meter

January 14, 2009 § 6 Comments

Paraphrasing William Luse:

At times, what I do is a truer measure of my intention than what I say is my intention, or even than what I think is my intention.

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§ 6 Responses to Intention-o-meter

  • Rodak says:

    While it may be true that to lust after a woman in one’s heart is to already have committed adultery; but it is also true that the woman lusted after isn’t involved in the sin. Moreover, it’s arguably true only on the <>other side<> of those Pearly Gates. I.e.,in divorce court, it’s nada.Maybe it’s just me, but I’d rather be the victim of an unrealized intention to blow up my house than be the victim of an actual bombing.Bombing ain’t beanbag.

  • Tom says:

    I think William James suggested something similar, that behavior is a better indicator of actual belief than is stated belief. (For that suggestion to be true, I’d say you’d have to include any subsequent remorse or satisfaction as part of the behavior.)

  • Rodak says:

    <>behavior is a better indicator of actual belief than is stated belief.<>Mr. Obama’s margin of victory would seem to support that. He scored better than he was polling.

  • Mouse says:

    <> that behavior is a better indicator of actual belief than is stated belief <> No, I like Zippy’s re-use of Luse’s comment. The act (done without force or constraint) is indicative of intention as such. Belief shown by action is more nebulous, since we often act in ways contrary to our belief (or at least, I do) and this is the reason confession is needed. But the fact of some <> sort <> of remorse is not enough, because it is impossible to ascertain adequately – it is, like supposed intention, subject to all sorts of qualifiers, conditions, imperfections, and self-illusion.

  • love the girls says:

    “At times, what I do is a truer measure of my intention than what I say is my intention, or even than what I think is my intention.”It can at times, no doubt. But not as a rule. The judge who orders the death of the convict, doesn’t intend the convicts death, (except as accidental while with full knowledge that it will occur), but intends the health of the state. Nor can the judge intend the death, (an objective evil), of the convict because to do so would be to will the death of another man which is strictly forbidden.___________________“it is intrinsically immoral to deliberately blow up an indiscriminately mixed group of innocents and combatants with a bomb.”Your qualifier which causes the act to be intrinsic, that is an intentional act, appears to be “indiscriminately mixed” But simply because there is an indiscriminate mixing does not of itself mean that the combatants cannot be targeted, it only means that they cannot be targeted with precision or accuracy.The method of killing becomes immoral when the choice is made to use an indiscriminate means of self defense when a better alternative is likewise available, or when the killing of the innocents knowingly out-weights the good intended.

  • zippy says:

    <>The judge who orders the death of the convict, doesn’t intend the convicts death, …<>I think he <>does<> intend to kill the convict, and that it is morally licit for him to do so because (1) as the competent authority he intends it on behalf of the common good, not himself, and (2) the convict is not an innocent.< HREF="http://www.newadvent.org/summa/3064.htm#article3" REL="nofollow">To wit<>:<>I answer that, As stated above (Article 2), it is lawful to kill an evildoer in so far as it is directed to the welfare of the whole community, so that it belongs to him alone who has charge of the community’s welfare. Thus it belongs to a physician to cut off a decayed limb, when he has been entrusted with the care of the health of the whole body. Now the care of the common good is entrusted to persons of rank having public authority: wherefore they alone, and not private individuals, can lawfully put evildoers to death.<>

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